Fun & Easy Science for Kids
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Boysenberry  

Berries are often called “super foods” because of their high antioxidant level, which is thought to keep the brain healthy and perhaps even protect against Alzheimer’s disease. Boysenberries are no exception. High in vitamins A and C, they’re loaded with antioxidants. And they’re delicious to boot!

Fun Facts

  • The boysenberry is a cross between a raspberry, a blackberry, and a loganberry.
  • The ripe berries are purplish black, sometimes mottled with red. The berries look like blackberries, but they are sweeter and more fragile.
  • Because boysenberries are fragile, they don’t travel well. For this reason, you’re less likely to see them fresh in grocery stores. They’re easier to find frozen.
  • Boysenberries were invented in the Napa Valley of California by Swedish immigrant Rudolph Boysen during the Great Depression.
  • The berries were made famous by berry expert and farmer Walter Knott and his wife Cordelia at their California farm. Throughout the Great Depression and for years after, the Knotts sold berries at berry stands. Today, the Knotts’ farm is the site of Knotts Berry Farms amusement park. If you visit, you can enjoy berry festivals and treats along with the exciting rides.

Vocabulary

  1. Super food: a food rich in nutrients and antioxidants
  2. Mottle: spotted
  3. Fragile: easily damaged

Questions and Answers

Question: How do people eat boysenberries?

Answer: Boysenberries are delicious eaten fresh out of hand, on cereal, or with ice cream. They’re made into sauces, pies, and jams.

Learn More

Learn about what it took to be a berry farmer in California during the Great Depression.

 

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Declan, Tobin. " Boysenberry Facts for Kids ." Easy Science for Kids, Jun 2018. Web. 20 Jun 2018. < http://easyscienceforkids.com/boysenberry/ >.

APA Style Citation

Tobin, Declan. (2018). Boysenberry Facts for Kids. Easy Science for Kids. Retrieved from http://easyscienceforkids.com/boysenberry/

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