Fun & Easy Science for Kids

Sydney Opera House

Sydney Opera House is Australia’s premier performing arts facility. It is one of the world’s most well-known and instantly recognizable music venues. It is situated on Bennelong Point in Sydney Harbour,...

Sydney Opera House

Posted in Architechture

Mona Lisa

The Mona Lisa is one of the most famous paintings in the world. It was created by world-famous Italian artist Leonardo da Vinci. It was painted sometime between 1503 and 1519. The subject of this painting is Lisa...

Mona Lisa

Posted in The Arts

Gateway Arch

Gateway Arch is America’s tallest memorial (height of 630 feet). It is also the tallest arch in the world. At its base, it is just as wide as it is tall. The construction began on February 12, 1963, and was completed on October 28, 1965. On June 10, 1967, it was opened to the public. It was...

Gateway Arch

Posted in Architechture | Tags : , , ,

Lincoln Memorial

Lincoln Memorial is located at the west end of Washington D.C.’s National Mall. It is one of the most beloved American monuments. It was built to honour the 16th US President Abraham Lincoln. He was one of the most...

Lincoln Memorial

Posted in Architechture | Tags : , , , ,

Machu Picchu

Machu Picchu is one of the most visited tourist destinations in Peru. It is made up of more than 150 buildings ranging from baths to houses, temples to sanctuaries. It is located in the Andes Mountains, more than 7,000 feet above sea...

Machu Picchu

Posted in Man-Made Wonders

Buckingham Palace

Buckingham Palace is the official London residence and administrative headquarters of the British Monarch. The first ever monarch to live here was Queen Victoria. She moved in on 13 July 1837. Queen Elizabeth II uses it as her...

Buckingham Palace

Posted in Architechture

White House

The White House is the official residence and workplace of the President of the United States. It is undoubtedly one of the most famous buildings in the world. Initially, it was known as Executive Mansion, the...

White House

Posted in Architechture

Memorial Day

Memorial Day is a federal holiday in the United States celebrated every year on the last Monday of the month of May. Originally, it was known as Decoration Day and started to honor the Union and the Confederate...

Memorial Day

Posted in Culture

Facts about Vanilla

The vanilla vine is an orchid which is indigenous to South Eastern Mexico. Now it is produced in many warm climates close to the equator. It is the only member of the orchid family that is edible. Only a few orchids produce fruits and...

Facts about Vanilla

Posted in Culture | Tags : , , ,

Christ the Redeemer

The massive statue of Christ the Redeemer is a matter of national pride for all Brazilians as Brazil is a religiously diverse country. In Portuguese, it is known as Cristo Redentor. This 38 meters tall statue is made of reinforced...

Christ the Redeemer

Posted in Man-Made Wonders | Tags : , , ,

The Alamo Facts

The Alamo is one of the most iconic landmarks in the United States. It is located in the Alamo Plaza District in San Antonio, Texas.  It is a secluded compound on over four acres. Approximately 2.5 million people visit this every year. It was originally built in early 1770s by the Spanish...

The Alamo Facts

Posted in Culture | Tags : , , ,

CN Tower Facts

Toronto’s CN Tower is one of the Seven Wonders of the Modern World. It is a 553.33 meter-high observation tower that makes it the tallest freestanding structure in the Western Hemisphere. The name of this tower is an acronym for the Canadian National Railway as it was built by the state...

CN Tower Facts

Posted in Man-Made Wonders

Presidents’ Day

Presidents’ Day falls on the third Monday in the month of February. This day is celebrated in the United States and is a national federal holiday. It is meant to celebrate George Washington and all other Presidents of the US. It was originally established in 1885 in recognition of the first US...

Presidents’ Day

Posted in Culture

Groundhog Day

Groundhog Day is celebrated on February 2 every year. It began as a Pennsylvanian German celebration in the 1800s. Initially, it started in Europe as Candelmas Day. In 1886, it was proclaimed as Pennsylvania’s first official Groundhog Day celebration. This American tradition is meant to...

Groundhog Day

Posted in Culture

Velcro

Fun Facts George de Mestral, a Swiss engineer and amateur naturalist, was walking his dog through the woods. When he returned home, he noticed cockleburs stuck to both his pants and his...

Velcro

Posted in Culture

Popsicles

What would summer be without cool, sweet, and delicious popsicles? But have you ever wondered who invented them? Would you believe it was an 11-year-old boy? Fun Facts In 1905, Frank Epperson left a cup filled with soda and a stirring stick on his front porch in...

Popsicles

Posted in Food

Paper Clips

Inventions almost always come as a solution to a problem. In the case of paper clips, the problem was paper. Office clerks were responsible for organizing and managing hundreds of pieces of paper. Before the paper clip, they used ribbon, string, or even straight pins to keep the papers in order....

Paper Clips

Posted in Culture

Breakfast Cereal

Cheerios®, Rice Krispies®, Cinnamon Toast Crunch®. It’s hard to imagine breakfast without our favorite breakfast cereals, but there was a time when getting breakfast on the table was a lot more work. Before the invention of modern breakfast cereals, people often ate large, cooked...

Breakfast Cereal

Posted in Food

Chewing Gum

Champion gum-chewer Violet Beauregarde met her match with Willy Wonka’s chewing gum meal, which sadly, doesn’t exist. But the history of chewing gum is almost as interesting as a tomato soup, roast beef, and

Chewing Gum

Posted in Culture

Zipper

For hundreds of years, buttons were the main fasteners for clothing and shoes. Boots were often fastened by a row of tiny buttons. Pants were fastened with buttons, which attached to a shirt, jacket, or suspenders to keep the pants up. Even stockings required buttons or ties to stay up. The...

Zipper

Posted in Culture

Shellfish

Shellfish aren’t really fish, but animals that live in water. They include oysters, mussels, clams, crabs, lobsters, shrimp, and crayfish. Shellfish were a major food source for Native Americans living on the East Coast. Early...

Shellfish

Posted in Food

Tofu

Cheese is made from heating cow’s milk to separate the solids (whey) from the liquid. The solids are then formed into cheese. Tofu is a similar product made by separating the solids in soymilk – made from soybeans – from the liquid. It was discovered in

Tofu

Posted in Food

Pasta

Mama Mia! Everyone loves pasta. This delicious dish has been around for a long time. People ate it in China 5,000 years ago. Researchers have found evidence that people were eating it in

Pasta

Posted in Food

Oatmeal

People have been growing and eating oats for at least 7,000 years. They were grown in ancient China, as well as ancient Greece. The Greeks were the first people to make them into porridge. They’re still a favorite food today and with...

Oatmeal

Posted in Food

Lentil

Lentils are an ancient food. Originally, they came from Asia and the Middle East. They are part of the legume family and they’re related to beans. Fun Facts Lentils are usually purchased...

Lentil

Posted in Food


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