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Flatiron Building  

The Flatiron Building has a distinctive triangular shape. It was built in 1902 and designed by Chicago architect Daniel Burnham. It is one of the most dramatic looking buildings in New York City, United States. This 22 storey steel-framed building measures 307 feet in height.

The building was originally intended to serve as offices for the George A. Fuller Company, a major Chicago contracting firm. It was also known as the Fuller Building. This building is located at the intersection of Broadway and Fifth Avenue.

 

Quick Facts: –

  • The Flatiron Building initially received widespread scepticism as it was believed that the triangle shape combined with the height would cause the building to fall down.
  • This was the reason why this building was nicknamed “Burnham’s Folly” during its construction.
  • This building was designated a New York City landmark in 1966 and designated a National Historic Landmark in 1989.
  • It was also added to the National Register of Historic places in 1979.
  • This building was probably featured on more postcards than any other building of its time.
  • At the narrower end, this building is just 6 feet wide. When viewed from above the pointed end of the structure describes an acute angle of about 25 degrees.
  • The Broadway front of the building is 190 feet wide. The Fifth Avenue front is 173 feet wide, and the 22nd Street side is just short of 87 feet wide.
  • There are Art Exhibitions in “The Prow” of The Flatiron Building.
  • This building had hydraulic elevators that were slow and bouncy. They malfunctioned in 1998.

 

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